The Merits of the #Blackandwhitechallenge

If you are on Facebook, chances are that you are currently seeing a lot more black and white photos. The latest viral challenge sensation asks participants to post a black and white photo each day, without humans and without explanation. Essentially, we are telling the stories of our week, simply by the objects and settings present in the images we select. I see multiple benefits to embarking in such an activity. First and foremost, creating a black and white image makes us approach photography in a more artistic manner. Most of us take pictures to capture events or the people in our lives. We rarely take pictures of wet leaves on the sidewalk or the halo of a streetlight on a misty evening.

Thanks to Instagram we have become more accustomed to filtering our images. Mostly, though, it is to find the most flattering or dramatic lighting, after the fact. We do not look at the sky and think, This would look amazing with the Nashville filter. At least, I don’t. I take a picture and then I see what happens when I apply the filters. Black and white imagery requires a bit more thought than this. The best images involve a contrasting play of patterns and a rich variety of gradients, meaning it involves both drama and subtly. I particularly like this list of tips: https://improvephotography.com/832/black-and-white-photography-tips/.

My limited photography training mostly involved taking black and white photographs. First, for my high school yearbook, and later for newspapers as a journalism intern. As I moved from the world of print to the world of the web, I no longer had to worry about the cost of colored ink and was allowed and expected to shoot and design with color. The black and white challenge reminds me of those early days in my visual arts journey when I was trying to get the basics down, focusing on light, shadow, shape, and balance (think rule of thirds). I miss those pre-digital days when I had to set everything manually: focus, aperture, and shutter speed.

Even if you do not get into the composing of a photograph, the challenge still can be enriching. On a psychological level, taking a daily photograph makes you pay attention to your surroundings, to the moment in which you are situated, and to the hidden beauty that is often unacknowledged in the hustle and bustle of everyday life. My gratitude for life increases when I take time to watch the water in the nearby creek and notice the elegant curve of the lamp that lights up the pages of the book I am reading. If you are being true to the challenge, and you do not seeing anything worthy of a picture in your current setting, you have a reason to walk outside and explore. It’s sad that we need a reason to do this, but when we have so many things competing for our attention, it’s hard to schedule time to wander. I enjoyed my Sunday morning meander through my yard. It was a great way to start the day.

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I give this social media challenge two thumbs up.

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