Last Post of the #CCCWrite Reflective Writing Club

Today is the last required post for the Online Network Reflective Writing Club:

  • Take some time to reflect back to the start of our Reflective Writing Club.
  • What were your objectives for this experience? Do you feel that you have achieved them?
  • Discuss any unexpected outcomes you have had as a result of the Reflective Writing Club.
  • Discuss any new or improved skills you’ve acquired through this blogging club and share how they will contribute to your work.

Is it strange that my favorite part of the Reflective Writing Club was the weekly deadline and expectations? I often say that I wish I were one of my own students, required to read, write, and reflect in a communal setting every week. For the past few weeks, I have gotten to be a writing student – brainstorming assigned prompts, reading examples for inspiration, and enjoying feedback. And like many a student, I often do not complete my work until I am under the pressure of a deadline.

My main objective was to write more and connect with more educators on Twitter, which I achieved. I really enjoyed how this club was facilitated, as it was structured and engaging enough to keep me motivated, yet it did not require an overwhelming commitment. It gave me a purposeful assignment each week and led me to follow some new inspiring instructors.

Going forward, I hope to use this activity as an example of an emerging form of professional development. As a community college faculty member, I do not have a large allowance for conferences, workshops, classes, and books. When I was finishing my dissertation, all my PDA went towards my doctoral credits. During this time, I could not travel to national and international conferences, but I could connect with educators around the world through Facebook and Twitter. Since then, I have become an advocate for these non-traditional means of professional development.

If anyone reading has suggestions for other writing or creative online education groups, please comment or message me on Twitter.

 

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The Art of Unplugging #CCCWrite

As I prepare for Spring Break, it is the perfect time to think about “unplugging,” which is this week’s Reflective Writing Prompt.

Growing up, I was an untethered, solar charged being whose life naturally involved the outdoors, as I lived and worked on a farm close to the shore of Lake Huron. When I wasn’t outside, I was at the local library, enjoying the air-conditioning, the silence, and most of all, the books. My only connections to the communication network were the rotatory dial phone in our family’s kitchen and the five television channels the antenna picked up.

Now, I have multiple social media and email accounts, online courses, cable TV, Amazon Prime, a smartphone, an iPad, and two computers. I also, though, thanks to the presence of my children, have a strict screen schedule. The New York Times recently published an editorial claiming that the real digital divide is now between children who do and do not have regulated screen time use. My children have restricted and specific screen time usage; therefore, I have restricted and specific screen time usage as well.

In my composition I classes, I have my students take a 24-hour media blackout challenge, in preparation for a reflective essay on their relationship with technology. Each semester, I take the challenge as well. One the whole, we finds the days seem to last much longer and we are able to accomplish more without the presence of media. When it comes to psychological effects, students usually fall into two camps: those who feel intense anxiety and those who feel more relaxed without their smartphones. The most important discovery, though, is how ingrained media/network technology has become in our lives. I do not know how to plan and prepare a dinner without the Internet 🙂 It’s a great experiential learning experiment and self check.