Tag Archives: New Media Writing

The key shift between composing for a print environment and composing for a digital environment is the number of “modes” available to aid in the storytelling. Modes are different forms of expression: linguistic, visual, aural, spatial, and gestural. In the discipline of English, we are most familiar with the linguistic, the selection, arrangement, and delivery of words. I like to say to be a new media writer you need to be a jack of all writer-605764_960_720trades and a master of one. For most of us, writing will be our “master trade.” The trick in new media writing is not relying solely, or too much, on our strongest and most comfortable form of expression.

While writing may be our strength, it may not always be the most effective mode. As the cliché goes, “A picture tells a thousand words.” Visuals can give viewers a more immediate understanding of a concept or situation. In addition, visual choices regarding size and color drives a viewer’s attention and shapes their understanding/perception of the message. Visual choices, not just linguistic choices, are a part of every paper we compose. For example, academic papers should look a particular way. We would not use pink Comic Sans for a font choice.

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In conjunction with the visual is the spatial. Appearance and function often work together. The spatial mode involves the arrangement of a piece and how people move about it. This movement can be how someone opens and consumes a brochure, how we navigate a website, or even how we sit in a classroom. The rhetoric of place is a fascinating area of study if you are into architecture, landscaping, or urban design. However, in this class, we will mostly look at layout and navigation. When we move from a print environment to a web environment, the spatial mode also expands, as web texts are not isolated — they can easily connect to other texts via hyperlinks.

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Another change as we enter the digital environment is the introduction of sound. Instead of reading an interview, we can hear an interview. As a standalone mode, sound allows 1-1260977459Qiyistories to become more portable. I can listen to a podcast while I drive and do household chores. As a supplementary element, it brings personality/culture to the individuals and places featured. We can use music as a new way to express tone: this is serious, this is relaxing, etc. This can get us into trouble at times if the music we have chosen is not appropriate to the situation or editorializes the content in negative manner.

The final mode is the one that we will employ least in this class, the gestural. Unless you celebration-1295014_960_720are delivering a monologue via your webcam, this won’t be a factor. The gestural is the way our bodies communicate: our expressions, our hand gestures, our posture, etc. If you are wondering an emoji could be counted as a gesture (I was), the answer is yes. At least, some scholars are arguing that they be considered as such. In this way, the gestural may find its way into your social media posts.

As you can see, we can express ourselves in many ways and can constructive meaning, at times, without even realizing it. In this class, we will be utilizing multiple modes whenever we construct a text. Our focus will not be on the technical aspects of page layout or audio editing; it will be on making good choices to create an effective, cohesive text where all the elements are appropriately selected and arranged.

For a more in-depth explanation of the five modes discussed, see: https://www.amazon.com/Writer-Designer-Making-Multimodal-Projects/dp/1457600455

 

Writing an Online Review

In the past decade we have seen the emergence of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Snapchat, which have reshaped the way we communicate and find information online.We’ve had to adapt and learn new programs in order to find friends, network, and get information. As new software, devices, Apps, cloud editors, and websites emerge, we must be able to find, test, and judge these new programs and tools to improve our productivity, entertainment options, and creative possibilities. This is just what we are doing for our first formal assignment in my New Media Writing class, the Technology Review.

In order to prep my students, I have made my own review of Superhero Workout and fell a little bit in love with Adobe Voice. Through Ipad screenshots, I was able to quickly make a little video to accompany my review. I do think I need some family shots of me working out with my tiny superheroes to add more character to the review, but I need to find us a set of matching superhero capes first.

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The number one rule of App selection is know thyself — how do you like to work, study, cook, read, etc. Apps should augment your lifestyle and productions, in short make it easier to be the awesome person you were meant to be. As a working mom, I find it difficult to make time to go to the gym. I discovered, though, that I can do workouts with my children if there is a novelty involved. We each have our own stability ball and often roll around the floor trying to imitate the moves on Youtube workout videos. So when I stumbled upon the app Superhero Workout, I thought it could be another workout we could do as a family.

What initially drew me to the App was the name, as my son is an avid fan of The Justice League and dressed as Batman over Halloween. I initially thought I would be fighting crime, ala Wonder Women style, but I later read on the website that the premise is this: “Earth is under threat of invasion. You are pilot of the AEGIS One battlesuit, our last line of defence. Your workout isn’t just about keeping in shape – it’s about saving the world [sic].” The misspelling of the word “defense” does make me question the app designers’ attention to detail. Still, I hoped it would entertain me enough to minimize the agony of jumping jacks, mountain climbers, and other moves designed to torture my body.

For $4.99, it delivers some level of novelty, though not as much as I would like. It delivers the “super-hero” feel through overlaying standard exercise animations with an audio storyline. However, when you are panting through high knee jogs, it is hard to follow along with the mission details. The app designers, though, did a decent job coordinating the plot with the exercise sequence. For instance, when you are defeating whatever enemy is upon you in the story, you are also doing boxing moves. When it is nearing the end of the 25-minute workout, the mission shouts words of encouragement, asking that you not give up. Still, I find standard workout music (think Rocky soundtrack) is a better motivator than imagining I am “clearing out spores.”

While I did not have high expectations for the camera tracking feature, as this is an Ipad app not an Xbox Kinect game, the workout design made tracking even more difficult. For the standard workout, you needed to be able to use a wall, a chair, and stairs. Unless I constantly repositioned the IPad, and subsequently missed a few reps of the workout, some of my moves wouldn’t be tracked. This wasn’t a big issue for me, though, as I was doing the workout moves with a five year old and three year old at times, so I had already discounted the possibility of accurate rep and calorie count. Still, I think the tracking feature is a nice one to include in a fitness application. Tracking works well as a motivator. You feel watched in a way that you do not when you are going through a workout DVD. It’s not the same social pressure as not keeping up in a face-to-face physical fitness class, but it is something.

However, I did like that the game has set up a series of short workouts to choose from in addition to their “missions.” Times vary from 7-11 minutes, so you can do a quick general workout or several target area workouts. The mission workouts range from 16-25 minutes. My children could not keep up physically or mentally with a workout that long. Midway through our second mission workout, as we began jumping jack squats, my three year old stopped and said she couldn’t go on because she “lost her powers.” Later in the workout, amazed that I was still doing the moves, my five year old chanted, “Mama’s a superhero! Mama’s a superhero!” I found this to be the most motivating moment of the workout, as honestly, nothing makes me feel less superhero-like than a push up. The best part for our little family is the workouts that end with the Superman move, where you lay on the floor and simultaneously hold up your arms and legs, probably because this is the most superhero-like move.

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Overall, this app motivated me to do exercise moves that I usually avoid. I like it doesn’t make me do a lot of repetitions of one move but constantly changes, usually switching moves every 30-60 seconds. This keeps me from getting bored or giving up when there is a move I particularly hate, such as burpees. I also like that there are 20 different missions and 46 different achievements you can obtain. It makes it as much a game as a workout. If I were to improve upon this game, I would add some graphical interludes during the missions instead of having it simply be an audio story. This would help orient me in the mission and make the experience more immersive. Something for Six to Start, the game designers, to consider as they work on their next game/exercise app.

Building a Blog and Twitter Rhetorical Analysis Worksheet

Here’s the questions I have so far. Please comment with suggestions if think an additional question needs to be added. I’m basing these off of the Norton Handbook’s defining of the rhetorical situation:

  1. What do you want to do with your Twitter feed and blog. Entertain? Inform? Persuade? Self promote? Make money? Write to learn? Gain professional development?
  2. How do you want to be perceived? Authoritative? Relatable? Witty? Well-read?
  3. What do you want your audience to do, think, or feel? How will they use what you tell them or share with them? What kind of response do you want? How can you elicit it?
  4. What is your audience’s background—their education and life experiences?
  5. What’s your relationship with your audience, and how does it affect your language and tone?
  6. How can you best appeal to your audience?
  7. What’s the appropriate look for your rhetorical situation? Should your blog design/profile picture look serious? Whimsical? Personal?
  8. How can you make best use of the mediums? (For example: What can be visual? What hashtags are relevant? Where can you add links?)
  9. How does the genre dictate your design style and writing choices? (For example: You should have shorter paragraphs and more white space when writing online)

The Beginning: Blogging and Social Media Platforms

We begin our new media writing journey with blogging and Tweeting, where success hinges upon on our ability to develop a distinct voice, to identify our audience, and to network. For example, there are thousands of cooking and lifestyle blogs online. To standout you need a unique lens, a fresh perspective, humor, or an innovative approach. Consider one of the most successful examples of a cooking and lifestyle blog, Pioneer Woman, which led to a show on the Food Network. She capitalized on the fact that she lives a lifestyle that most of us can only imagine on a large cattle ranch in Oklahoma. It has humor, tradition, and cowboys. Of course, not all of us are willing to market ourselves and our lives in that much detail.

 “In Confessions, I post photos of cows, horses, and my four weird children…as well as frequent shots of my husband wearing chaps” – The Pioneer Woman

Blogging begins by asking what it is you have to offer your audience.  Could you deliver informed and educated cultural commentary, a humorous take on everyday life, a skill you can teach others, etc.? Examine successful blogs that fall into the same category as yours (technology how-to, parenting, pop culture) — what makes them standout in the crowd? Next, we learn about your potential audience through Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest — discovering what they (moms, gamers, fans) are most likely to retweet, share, or pin.

Like the Pioneer Woman, who left big city life to become a rural homemaker, new media writers are also on a journey. We are operating in a constantly evolving medium. As soon as we learn one application, we must transfer our knowledge to another. I am here to document these journeys. That is what I have to offer my audience. My lens is my academic training, which helps me understand the distributed agency that exists within online writing. We are dependent on our technology and on our network of viewers. To be successful, I not only have to be witty, creative, and informed, I need to have a readership that can put my advice into practice, offer commentary, and spread the word.